The Sure Cure for Diabetes – Pancreas Transplantation

Pancreas Transplantation is a surgical procedure,  in which the whole pancreas from the deceased donor is harvested. Then it is  replaced to the recipient whose pancreas is no longer functions properly

The pancreas is an organ that lies in the back of the lower part of your stomach. One of its essential functions is to make insulin, a hormone that regulates the absorption of sugar (glucose) into your cells.

If the pancreas does not make adequate insulin, blood sugar levels can shoot to unhealthy levels, resulting in type 1 diabetes.

Most pancreas transplants are performed to treat type 1 diabetes. A pancreas transplant provides a viable cure for this condition. Pancreas transplants involve high risks and side effects hence it is significantly reserved for extreme diabetes complications.

In some cases, pancreas transplants may also treat type 2 diabetes. Rarely, pancreas transplants may also be used in the therapy of pancreatic, bile duct or cancers.

A pancreas transplant is often performed in conjunction with a kidney transplant. This will be done for the people whose kidneys have been damaged by diabetes.

Why it is done

A pancreas transplant can restore normal insulin production and enhance blood sugar management in people with diabetes, however, it’s not a general treatment. Anti-rejection medicines may cause serious complications after a pancreas transplant

For people with any of the following, a pancreas transplant can be worth considering:

  • Type 1 diabetes that cannot be controlled with standard treatment
  • Frequent insulin reactions
  • Consistently poor blood sugar control
  • Severe kidney damage
  • Type 2 diabetes related to both low insulin resistance and low insulin production

 

A pancreas transplant may not be a choice for type-2 diabetes patients, because for type-2 diabetes patients they may produce the normal level of Insulin but the insulin produced may not be utilized properly as the body becomes resistant to insulin.

But for the patient with low insulin production and low resistance, the pancreas transplant is a genuine option.  About 10 percent of all pancreas transplants are performed in people with type 2 diabetes.

There are different types of pancreas transplants, including:

Pancreas transplant alone.

Pancreas transplant alone can be done for the candidates who have no kidney disease and requires the only pancreas for their survival.A pancreas transplant surgical treatment involves only a pancreas transplant besides other surgeries.

Combined kidney-pancreas transplant.

For people with diabetes and at the risk of severe kidney damage, Kidney-Pancreas transplant could be a better option. More than two-thirds of pancreas transplants are executed simultaneously with a kidney transplant.

The purpose of this approach is to provide you a healthy kidney and pancreas that are not likely to contribute to diabetes-related kidney damage in the future.

Pancreas-after-kidney transplant.

When the patient is waiting for both Kidney and pancreas and if the kidney is matching and available immediately to the recipient, a Kidney transplant is also recommended first before the pancreas.

After you get better from kidney transplant surgery, you may receive the pancreas transplant once a donor pancreas becomes available.

Insulin-producing cells (islet cells) are taken from the deceased donor and then it is injected into the bloodstream of the recipients during the Pancreatic islet cell transplant. The Insulin-producing cells reach the liver and pancreas through the bloodstream and grow to produce more amount of Insulin.

Although it’s possible for a living donor to donate phase of a pancreas, almost all pancreas transplants involve a deceased-donor pancreas.

  • Risks
  • Complications of the procedure
  • Pancreas transplant surgical procedure includes a risk of sizable complications, including:
  • Blood clots
  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Excess sugar in the blood (hyperglycemia) or other metabolic problems
  • Urinary complications, including leaking or urinary tract infections
  • Failure of the donated pancreas
  • Rejection of the donated pancreas

Anti-rejection medication side effects

After a pancreas transplant, you may take medicines for the rest of your life to help prevent your body from rejecting the donor pancreas. These anti-rejection medications can cause a range of side effects, including:

  • Bone thinning (osteoporosis)
  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Nausea, diarrhea or vomiting
  • Sun sensitivity
  • Puffiness
  • Weight gain
  • Swollen gums
  • Acne
  • Excessive hair growth or loss

To accept the donor’s organ from rejection, Anti-rejection drugs are used by suppressing the immune system of the recipient, Hence the recipient’s body defense system becomes compromised and prone to infections.

Do you have questions after reading this article? Please let us know! Leave a comment below, we would love to give you some answers! For the best Healthcare Facilitator Services Contact the number below.

Have Questions? Enquire Now

Call +91 9600195686

pep and std

Post-Exposure Prophylaxis & Sexually Transmitted Disease

Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) means taking antiretroviral medicines (ART) after being potentially exposed to HIV to prevent becoming infected.

Post-exposure prophylaxis, or PEP, is another name for emergency HIV treatment. PEP is not a cure for HIV, it is a form of HIV prevention. It is a short course of antiretroviral drugs that stops exposure to HIV from becoming a life-long infection.

PEP should be started within 72 hours after a recent possible exposure to HIV. If you think you’ve

Recently been exposed to HIV during sex or unprotected Sex.

Causes of HIV

Through sharing needles and works to prepare drugs

Causes of HIV

If sexually assaulted seek urgent medical help.

 

Relief from stress

Health care workers exposed to HIV at Work.

If you think that you have been exposed to HIV visit a healthcare clinic, doctor, pharmacy or contact us immediately.

Not everyone is given PEP and it is not available everywhere. A healthcare professional will advise you if they think you should take PEP.

PEP and HIV testing

HIV TESTING

It’s normal to feel anxious about being infected with HIV.Test for HIV in the following duration after exposure.

  • If you took PEP – get tested 3 and 6 months after potential exposure.
  • If you didn’t take PEP – get tested 3 months after potential exposure

Emotional support, advice and counselling

CounsellingGetting the right support is important before, during and after taking PEP. It can help address any concerns or fears that you might have. Attend follow-up visits with your healthcare team regularly.

PEP must not be used as a frequent way to prevent HIV infection. Use condoms and safer sex practises to prevent sexual transmission of HIV.

When Should you start PEP?

Start PepPEP must be started within 72 hours after a possible exposure. The sooner you start PEP, the better; every hour counts.

Starting PEP as soon as possible after a potential HIV exposure is important. Research has shown that PEP has little or no effect in preventing HIV infection if it is started later than 72 hours after HIV exposure.

How long Should PEP is Prescribed?

PEP drugs to be taken once or twice daily for 28 days.

How effective is PEP Therapy?

PEP is effective in preventing HIV when administered correctly, but not 100%.

Pep Therapy

If you think that you have been exposed to HIV visit a healthcare clinic, doctor, pharmacy or contact us immediately.

 

Sexually Transmitted Disease

 

Sexually Transmitted Diseases STDs are infections that are passed from one person to another during vaginal, anal, and oral sex. They’re truly common, and plenty of people who have them don’t have any symptoms. STDs can be dangerous, however, most STDs are treatable. Test yourself for STD

  1. If you think you recently been exposed to during sex or unprotected Sex.
  2. Through sharing needles and works to prepare drugs
  3. If sexually assaulted seek urgent medical help.
  4. Health care workers exposed at Work.

Types of STD:

Sexually Transmitted Disease can be Caused by Viruses, Bacteria, Parasites. Let us see various pathology of STD.

STDs caused by viruses:

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

HIV causes the immune system – the device in the body that is supposed to fight off infection – to not work as properly as it should. This makes humans with HIV more probably to get infections and some other diseases, like some cancers. HIV is the virus that causes AIDS.

Hepatitis viruses

Hepatitis is an infection of the liver. There are three common types of hepatitis:

  1. Hepatitis A
  2. Hepatitis B
  3. Hepatitis C.

Hepatitis-A causes a short-term liver infection. Hepatitis-B and hepatitis-C cause much more serious, long-lasting liver problems

Both can purpose very bad liver disease, like cirrhosis, and death. They are more probably than hepatitis A to be spread by having sex.

Human papillomavirus (HPV)

There are about 40 different types of HPV that can be spread through sex and affect the anus and genitals. Examples of diseases that HPV can reason include:

  1. Genital warts
  2. Cancers of the penis, vagina, anal, mouth, or throat
  3. Cervical cancer (over 70% of cervical cancers – 7 cases out of each and every 10 – are brought about through HPV)

Herpes simplex virus

The herpes simplex virus (HSV) causes genital herpes. Genital herpes can cause painful blisters on the genitals and anus. Herpes can also cause sores in the mouth. There is no cure for herpes.

STDs Caused by Bacteria:

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is one of the most frequent STD in the world. It was caused by bacteria. About 30% of the world population get chlamydia infection every year.

If chlamydia is not treated, it can cause a serious problem. Like diseases of the genitals and eyes. It can even reason blindness. It can also purpose permanent damage to a woman reproductive system if it is no longer treated.

Gonorrhea

It can infect the genitals, mouth, throat, rectum, and eyes. In bad cases, it can spread via the blood to infect the body’s joints. In the worst cases, it can spread through the blood and infect the heart (causing endocarditis, and contamination of the heart’s valves) or the spinal wire inflicting meningitis.

Syphilis

Syphilis can cause many serious problems if it is not treated. It makes a person much more likely to get HIV because it causes sores on the genitals that make it easier for HIV (and other STDs) to get spread. After a few years, if people with syphilis do not get treated, they can have serious problems with them in their body.Eventually – without treatment – syphilis infects the brain and causes death.

STDs Caused by parasites:

Trichomoniasis:

Trichomoniasis a germ causing a benign infection known as trichomoniasis. It is the treatable infection which is cured with a simple course of antibiotics. The symptoms it causes are common STD symptoms, namely an abnormal discharge from the genitals and pain when urinating or when having sex.

Symptoms of emergency STD:

  1. Chest pain
  2. Severe pain
  3. Uncontrolled bleeding
  4. Persistent diarrhea/vomiting
  5. Vomiting/coughing blood
  6. Shortness of breath
  7. Sudden dizziness, fainting, weakness or mental status changes

 Protection before STD:

causes of HIV

Effective STD prevention starts before sexual activity occurs. Here are some steps you can take to decrease your STD danger before having sex:

  1. Avoid sex when under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
  2. Get tested, along with your partners, before having sex.
  3. Limit our number of sexual partners.
  4. Talk honestly with potential partners about both of your sexual histories.
  5. Get vaccinated against the hepatitis B (HBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV)

Having a conversation about sexual fitness with your associate is key, however not every person with STDs knows they’re infected. That’s why it’s so essential to get tested before you have sex with a new partner.

Prevention of STD

The only way for a person to be positive they will not get an STD is for that person not to have sex. This includes sex of any kind.

There are some things that a person can do to make it less likely to get an STI:

  1. Practice safer sex. Use condoms and different types of birth control
  2. Stay with one sexual partner who has tested negative for STDs
  3. Do not have sex with anyone until you are each tested for STDs
  4. Get the vaccines for HPV, hepatitis A, and hepatitis B

Diagnosis

If your sexual records and modern signs and symptoms recommend that you have an STI, laboratory assessments can discover the purpose and realize co-infections you may have contracted.

  1. Urine samples.Some STIs can be confirmed with a urine sample.
  2. Blood tests.It can confirm the diagnosis of HIV or later stages of syphilis.
  3. Fluid samples.If you have active genital sores, testing fluid and samples from the sores may be done to diagnose the type of infection. Laboratory tests of material from a genital sore or discharge are used to diagnose some STIs.

Screening

Blood TestTesting for a disease in anyone who would not have symptoms is called screening. Most of the time, STD screening is not a routine part of health care, however, there are exceptions:

  1. The STI screening test is suggested  for everyone who has ages 13 to 64 is a saliva or blood test for HIV,
  2. Pregnant women. Screening for HIV, chlamydia, hepatitis-B, and syphilis commonly take place at the first prenatal visit for all pregnant women. Hepatitis C and gonorrhea screening checks are advocated at least once at some point of pregnancy a for a female at high danger of these infections.
  3. Women age 21 and older. The Pap test displays for cervical abnormalities, consisting of precancerous changes, inflammation, and cancer, which is often induced by certain lines of human papillomavirus (HPV). Experts suggest that beginning at age 21, women should have a Pap check at least each and every three years. After age 30, women are recommended to have an HPV DNA test and a Pap test every 5 years or a Pap check every three years.
  4. Women under age 25 who are sexually active. All sexually energetic women below age 25 must be tested for chlamydia infection. The chlamydia test makes use of a pattern of urine or vaginal fluid you can acquire yourself. Some specialists suggest repeating the chlamydia test three months after you’ve had an effective test and been treated.
  5. Men who have sex with men. Compared with different groups, men who have sex with men run a greater chance of acquiring STIs. Many public health organizations suggest annual or more common STI screening for these men. Regular checks for HIV, syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhea are particularly important.
  6. People with HIV. People with HIV should also be screened for Hepatitis C.If you have HIV, it dramatically raises your threat of catching other STIs. Experts suggest immediate checking out for chlamydia, syphilis, gonorrhea, herpes and after being identified with HIV. Women with HIV may improve aggressive cervical cancer, so they have a Pap test within a year of being recognized with HIV, and then again six months later.
  7. People who have a new partner. Before having vaginal or anal intercourse with new partners, be sure that you’ve got each been examined for STIs. Keep in thinking that Human Papillomavirus (HPV) screening isn’t reachable for men. No exact screening test exists for genital herpes for both sex, so you may not be conscious you’re infected till you have symptoms.

Do you have questions after reading this article? Please let us know! Leave a comment below, we would love to give you some answers! For the best Healthcare Facilitator Services Contact the number below.

Have Questions? Enquire Now

Call +91 9600195686

 

 

 

 

std

Facts About Sexually Transmitted Disease That Will Blow Your Mind

Sexually Transmitted Diseases STDs are infections that are passed from one person to another during vaginal, anal, and oral sex. They’re truly common, and plenty of people who have them don’t have any symptoms. STDs can be dangerous, however, most STDs are treatable. Test yourself for STD

  1. If you think you recently been exposed to during sex or unprotected Sex.
  2. Through sharing needles and works to prepare drugs
  3. If sexually assaulted seek urgent medical help.
  4. Health care workers exposed at Work.

Types of STD:

Sexually Transmitted Disease can be Caused by Viruses, Bacteria, Parasites. Let us see various pathology of STD.

STDs caused by viruses:

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

HIV causes the immune system – the device in the body that is supposed to fight off infection – to not work as properly as it should. This makes humans with HIV more probably to get infections and some other diseases, like some cancers. HIV is the virus that causes AIDS.

Hepatitis viruses

Hepatitis is an infection of the liver. There are three common types of hepatitis:

  1. Hepatitis A
  2. Hepatitis B
  3. Hepatitis C.

Hepatitis-A causes a short-term liver infection. Hepatitis-B and hepatitis-C cause much more serious, long-lasting liver problems

Both can purpose very bad liver disease, like cirrhosis, and death. They are more probably than hepatitis A to be spread by having sex.

Human papillomavirus (HPV)

There are about 40 different types of HPV that can be spread through sex and affect the anus and genitals. Examples of diseases that HPV can reason include:

  1. Genital warts
  2. Cancers of the penis, vagina, anal, mouth, or throat
  3. Cervical cancer (over 70% of cervical cancers – 7 cases out of each and every 10 – are brought about through HPV)

Herpes simplex virus

The herpes simplex virus (HSV) causes genital herpes. Genital herpes can cause painful blisters on the genitals and anus. Herpes can also cause sores in the mouth. There is no cure for herpes.

STDs Caused by Bacteria:

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is one of the most frequent STD in the world. It was caused by bacteria. About 30% of the world population get chlamydia infection every year.

If chlamydia is not treated, it can cause a serious problem. Like diseases of the genitals and eyes. It can even reason blindness. It can also purpose permanent damage to a woman reproductive system if it is no longer treated.

Gonorrhea

It can infect the genitals, mouth, throat, rectum, and eyes. In bad cases, it can spread via the blood to infect the body’s joints. In the worst cases, it can spread through the blood and infect the heart (causing endocarditis, and contamination of the heart’s valves) or the spinal wire inflicting meningitis.

Syphilis

Syphilis can cause many serious problems if it is not treated. It makes a person much more likely to get HIV because it causes sores on the genitals that make it easier for HIV (and other STDs) to get spread. After a few years, if people with syphilis do not get treated, they can have serious problems with them in their body.Eventually – without treatment – syphilis infects the brain and causes death.

STDs Caused by parasites:

Trichomoniasis:

Trichomoniasis a germ causing a benign infection known as trichomoniasis. It is the treatable infection which is cured with a simple course of antibiotics. The symptoms it causes are common STD symptoms, namely an abnormal discharge from the genitals and pain when urinating or when having sex.

Symptoms of emergency STD:

  1. Chest pain
  2. Severe pain
  3. Uncontrolled bleeding
  4. Persistent diarrhea/vomiting
  5. Vomiting/coughing blood
  6. Shortness of breath
  7. Sudden dizziness, fainting, weakness or mental status changes

 Protection before STD:

causes of HIV

Effective STD prevention starts before sexual activity occurs. Here are some steps you can take to decrease your STD danger before having sex:

  1. Avoid sex when under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
  2. Get tested, along with your partners, before having sex.
  3. Limit our number of sexual partners.
  4. Talk honestly with potential partners about both of your sexual histories.
  5. Get vaccinated against the hepatitis B (HBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV)

Having a conversation about sexual fitness with your associate is key, however not every person with STDs knows they’re infected. That’s why it’s so essential to get tested before you have sex with a new partner.

Prevention of STD

The only way for a person to be positive they will not get an STD is for that person not to have sex. This includes sex of any kind.

There are some things that a person can do to make it less likely to get an STI:

  1. Practice safer sex. Use condoms and different types of birth control
  2. Stay with one sexual partner who has tested negative for STDs
  3. Do not have sex with anyone until you are each tested for STDs
  4. Get the vaccines for HPV, hepatitis A, and hepatitis B

Diagnosis

If your sexual records and modern signs and symptoms recommend that you have an STI, laboratory assessments can discover the purpose and realize co-infections you may have contracted.

  1. Urine samples.Some STIs can be confirmed with a urine sample.
  2. Blood tests.It can confirm the diagnosis of HIV or later stages of syphilis.
  3. Fluid samples.If you have active genital sores, testing fluid and samples from the sores may be done to diagnose the type of infection. Laboratory tests of material from a genital sore or discharge are used to diagnose some STIs.

Screening

Blood TestTesting for a disease in anyone who would not have symptoms is called screening. Most of the time, STD screening is not a routine part of health care, however, there are exceptions:

  1. The STI screening test is suggested  for everyone who has ages 13 to 64 is a saliva or blood test for HIV,
  2. Pregnant women. Screening for HIV, chlamydia, hepatitis-B, and syphilis commonly take place at the first prenatal visit for all pregnant women. Hepatitis C and gonorrhea screening checks are advocated at least once at some point of pregnancy a for a female at high danger of these infections.
  3. Women age 21 and older. The Pap test displays for cervical abnormalities, consisting of precancerous changes, inflammation, and cancer, which is often induced by certain lines of human papillomavirus (HPV). Experts suggest that beginning at age 21, women should have a Pap check at least each and every three years. After age 30, women are recommended to have an HPV DNA test and a Pap test every 5 years or a Pap check every three years.
  4. Women under age 25 who are sexually active. All sexually energetic women below age 25 must be tested for chlamydia infection. The chlamydia test makes use of a pattern of urine or vaginal fluid you can acquire yourself. Some specialists suggest repeating the chlamydia test three months after you’ve had an effective test and been treated.
  5. Men who have sex with men. Compared with different groups, men who have sex with men run a greater chance of acquiring STIs. Many public health organizations suggest annual or more common STI screening for these men. Regular checks for HIV, syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhea are particularly important.
  6. People with HIV. People with HIV should also be screened for Hepatitis C.If you have HIV, it dramatically raises your threat of catching other STIs. Experts suggest immediate checking out for chlamydia, syphilis, gonorrhea, herpes and after being identified with HIV. Women with HIV may improve aggressive cervical cancer, so they have a Pap test within a year of being recognized with HIV, and then again six months later.
  7. People who have a new partner. Before having vaginal or anal intercourse with new partners, be sure that you’ve got each been examined for STIs. Keep in thinking that Human Papillomavirus (HPV) screening isn’t reachable for men. No exact screening test exists for genital herpes for both sex, so you may not be conscious you’re infected till you have symptoms.

Do you have questions after reading this article? Please let us know! Leave a comment below, we would love to give you some answers! For the best Healthcare Facilitator Services Contact the number below.

Have Questions? Enquire Now

Call +91 9600195686

 

 

 

A New Way to Think About Pancreas transplant

Pancreas Transplantation is a surgical procedure,  in which the whole pancreas from the deceased donor is harvested. Then it is  replaced to the recipient whose pancreas is no longer functions properly

The pancreas is an organ that lies in the back of the lower part of your stomach. One of its essential functions is to make insulin, a hormone that regulates the absorption of sugar (glucose) into your cells.

If the pancreas does not make adequate insulin, blood sugar levels can shoot to unhealthy levels, resulting in type 1 diabetes.

Most pancreas transplants are performed to treat type 1 diabetes. A pancreas transplant provides a viable cure for this condition. Pancreas transplants involve high risks and side effects hence it is significantly reserved for extreme diabetes complications.

In some cases, pancreas transplants may also treat type 2 diabetes. Rarely, pancreas transplants may also be used in the therapy of pancreatic, bile duct or cancers.

A pancreas transplant is often performed in conjunction with a kidney transplant. This will be done for the people whose kidneys have been damaged by diabetes.

Why it is done

A pancreas transplant can restore normal insulin production and enhance blood sugar management in people with diabetes, however, it’s not a general treatment. Anti-rejection medicines may cause serious complications after a pancreas transplant

For people with any of the following, a pancreas transplant can be worth considering:

  • Type 1 diabetes that cannot be controlled with standard treatment
  • Frequent insulin reactions
  • Consistently poor blood sugar control
  • Severe kidney damage
  • Type 2 diabetes related to both low insulin resistance and low insulin production

 

A pancreas transplant may not be a choice for type-2 diabetes patients, because for type-2 diabetes patients they may produce the normal level of Insulin but the insulin produced may not be utilized properly as the body becomes resistant to insulin.

But for the patient with low insulin production and low resistance, the pancreas transplant is a genuine option.  About 10 percent of all pancreas transplants are performed in people with type 2 diabetes.

There are different types of pancreas transplants, including:

Pancreas transplant alone.

Pancreas transplant alone can be done for the candidates who have no kidney disease and requires the only pancreas for their survival.A pancreas transplant surgical treatment involves only a pancreas transplant besides other surgeries.

Combined kidney-pancreas transplant.

For people with diabetes and at the risk of severe kidney damage, Kidney-Pancreas transplant could be a better option. More than two-thirds of pancreas transplants are executed simultaneously with a kidney transplant.

The purpose of this approach is to provide you a healthy kidney and pancreas that are not likely to contribute to diabetes-related kidney damage in the future.

Pancreas-after-kidney transplant.

When the patient is waiting for both Kidney and pancreas and if the kidney is matching and available immediately to the recipient, a Kidney transplant is also recommended first before the pancreas.

After you get better from kidney transplant surgery, you may receive the pancreas transplant once a donor pancreas becomes available.

Insulin-producing cells (islet cells) are taken from the deceased donor and then it is injected into the bloodstream of the recipients during the Pancreatic islet cell transplant. The Insulin-producing cells reach the liver and pancreas through the bloodstream and grow to produce more amount of Insulin.

Although it’s possible for a living donor to donate phase of a pancreas, almost all pancreas transplants involve a deceased-donor pancreas.

  • Risks
  • Complications of the procedure
  • Pancreas transplant surgical procedure includes a risk of sizable complications, including:
  • Blood clots
  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Excess sugar in the blood (hyperglycemia) or other metabolic problems
  • Urinary complications, including leaking or urinary tract infections
  • Failure of the donated pancreas
  • Rejection of the donated pancreas

Anti-rejection medication side effects

After a pancreas transplant, you may take medicines for the rest of your life to help prevent your body from rejecting the donor pancreas. These anti-rejection medications can cause a range of side effects, including:

  • Bone thinning (osteoporosis)
  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Nausea, diarrhea or vomiting
  • Sun sensitivity
  • Puffiness
  • Weight gain
  • Swollen gums
  • Acne
  • Excessive hair growth or loss

To accept the donor’s organ from rejection, Anti-rejection drugs are used by suppressing the immune system of the recipient, Hence the recipient’s body defense system becomes compromised and prone to infections.

Do you have questions after reading this article? Please let us know! Leave a comment below, we would love to give you some answers! For the best Healthcare Facilitator Services Contact the number below.

Have Questions? Enquire Now

Call +91 9600195686

Know More About Diabetes

Imagine this scene. Your physician tells you that you have diabetes. You are afraid as you are not too certain what it all means. You start hearing new terms such as blood glucose, insulin, hemoglobin A1c, fasting blood glucose, fasting blood sugars and it appears overwhelming. So let’s take a minute to know about the terminologies it down. Understanding your ailment is the first step in maintaining your health. Know More about Diabetes.

So what exactly does it mean to have diabetes?

When a person eats, whether they have diabetes or not, the glucose level in their blood rises. The term “blood glucose level” is generally referred to as “blood sugar”. A rise in blood glucose levels after eating is normal, and it’s how the body nourishes the cells. When a character does not have diabetes, the pancreas produces insulin, whose job it is to deliver down glucose levels in the blood movement before it rises to a risky level. Insulin equalizes blood glucose levels to secure levels.

But when an individual has diabetes, their pancreas does not produce enough insulin, if any at all, or the insulin they produce is no longer working properly. Therefore, when a person has diabetes, the blood glucose rises unimpeded, causing damage to the organs. If uncontrolled and tiers upward thrust dangerously high, it can lead to coma or death. November 14th is targeted as World Diabetes Day.Know More about Diabetes.

What causes glucose ranges to rise?

Blood sugars in our blood elevate naturally when we eat, in order to feed our cells. But not all foods cause an equal rise in blood sugar. Foods containing carbohydrates make blood glucose levels to go up sharply. When these ranges go beyond safe levels, damage occurs to organs and nerve endings. Foods has high in carbohydrates include, but are not restricted to bread, pasta, crackers, cereals, starchy vegetables such as potatoes, peas, and corn, milk, soy milk, yogurt, fruits and fruit juices, grains and legumes, snack foods such as chips and pretzels, cakes, cookies, sweet and table sugar. Proteins (meat, chicken, eggs, fish,) and non-starchy vegetables are low in carbohydrates and will now not cause a sharp upward jostle in glucose levels.

What is the goal of blood glucose levels?

According to the American Diabetes Association, a fasting blood glucose need to be 80-130 mg/dl, and 2 hours after eating, blood glucose needs to be much less than 180 mg/dl for a person who has diabetes.

How regularly should blood glucose be checked?

Blood glucose levels are constantly fluctuating due to what you ate, how much you ate and how long ago you ate. Although it seems tedious, checking your blood sugars before and after you consume is the great way to understand the relationship between what you are eating and how it impacts your glucose levels. two It is necessary to take a look at your blood glucose before you eat to understand you’re starting off point.

Hidden Carbohydrates

There are foods that have “hidden” carbohydrates that are not so obvious to detect, so checking your blood sugars after a meal is important.  For example, it is known that Chinese food can be high in sodium. But cornstarch, a carbohydrate source is regularly used as a thickener to thicken sauces in Chinese cuisine. Therefore, ordering meat and broccoli stir fry may seem like a healthy choice, however, unless you test your blood glucose level, you may no longer be aware how a dish with sauce is affecting your level. Keeping a food log that you can share with your physician or dietitian with the following data can also be helpful.

 

Pre-meal glucose Post-meal glucose Time Food Quantity Hunger level 1-5 Mood (ie bored, stressed)

Identifying starvation stage and mood is beneficial if overeating is an issue. It can assist you to pinpoint situations that promote overeating.Know More about Diabetes.

What takes place if blood glucose degrees are persistently uncontrolled?

High blood glucose levels are harmful to the organs and most particularly the kidneys, eyes and nerve endings. The effect of excessive blood glucose on the body is cumulative; which means that, even though your blood sugars ultimately come down, the injury to your organs has been done and it is now not reversible. Some of the side effects of persistently high blood glucose are cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, maybe leading to dialysis, blindness, decreased wound healing as well as nerve damage leading to pain and amputation of limbs.

What is a hemoglobin A1c?

A hemoglobin A1c stage (A1c for short) is a blood test that suggests the average blood glucose level for the previous 3 months. A single glucose level (like when you stick your finger and take a reading) looks at one level at one moment in time, but A1c appears at the average blood sugars for a three-month duration of time. This gives your healthcare crew a better thinking of the “story” of your glucose levels for a period of time. So the single blood glucose level is like a picture but an A1c level is like seeing the movie. See the chart below for the A1c levels and the corresponding average blood sugars.

A1c level

Average glucose level (mg/dL)

6% 125
7% 154
8% 183
9% 212
10% 240
11% 269
12% 298

So if your physician tells you your A1c level is at 10%, it means that your average glucose levels are at 240 mg/dl. This is a purpose for the problem as this will have a poor impact on your health.

How can blood sugars be controlled?

It is possible to hold your blood sugars within a healthy vary and enjoy foods that you like, in moderation. Eating smaller, frequent meals helps to avoid blood sugar highs and lows. Replacing some carbohydrate meals with lean proteins or non-starchy vegetables helps you to avoid the undesirable peaks and valleys associated with uncontrolled blood glucose levels. Make your plate about half non-starchy vegetables, a quarter lean protein, and a quarter carbohydrate foods. Make sure to learn which foods contain carbohydrates so that you are conscious of how your glucose levels are affected by what you eat. Maintain a healthy weight. Regularly check your glucose levels. Visit your doctor regularly. Ask your doctor to refer you to a registered dietitian. Take your medicinal drugs as prescribed and stay on top of your disease.

We’ve all heard the saying “your health is the most important thing.” Why? Because when you lose your health, you lose your freedom. So, preserve your health and maintain your independence. Thanks to Know More about Diabetes.

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